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and the truth is, they are brutal. you look what is happening in the iranian energy area, not only the fact that they're able to sell, you know, less than 50% of what they were selling before. it is that their production, their output is down from over 4 million barrels a day to 2.6 million barrels a day. part of the reason for that is precisely because of the sanctions, the inability to continue to invest in the energy infrastructure, the inability to continue to pump and store oil as they shut down oil fields that may not be so easy for them to recoup. you look what is happening to the currency, the devaluation. there are some estimates that the currency is being devalued by half every two months. think about what that means. it means that what you're buying, when you go and you buy something it costs you twice as much. it means what you have in the bank is worth half as much. if this is continuing to happen, it is bound to have an effect on the society as a whole whole. look at what the supreme leader has been saying over the last couple weeks. on more than one occasion he has explicitly
underutilization of capital i equipment. the one issue we need to face is resource costs and energy prices. that is not a question which is being driven by overuse at the moment, it's being driven by other factors. i'm not as optimistic as stephanie is about the long-term potential path, but is there a trade-off between what we should do to protect our elderly population and to provide adequate medical care to the whole poppation and what we should do to reconstruct our infrastructure and address energy and climate issues? no. we are underperforming on both fronts. >> but there's a -- it's not a budget tear trade-off, it's -- budgetary trade-off, as long as we think revenues can only be this high, then there's a fight among those priorities. we have to accept having higher revenues to pay for the things we want. that softens that trade-off. the entitlements are not, are not a drain on real resources, they're a transfer. but there is a question of public sector investment versus what's going on in the private sector. when we're at full capacity, we have that trade-off. but the issue is, um,
of their energy and time focused on their ill health, where the ramifications of that were family members, there's just not much space for doing the things we'd like to see. so we have great ideas, wonderful examples of governments and education and so forth that we have seen and would like to spread. people don't have time for them, can't focus on it. and the vacancy -- the vacuum created by that basic security invites trouble. in my experience, this is where problems are. as i look around the world, there are a few areas that are well educated and well defined, but there are vast areas that troubles some, that are hallmarks by lack of stability and security and so forth. so i think in my mind, decent dvd. not every case because it's a good quote. lots of different situations, but that's when. the chama manufacturing front and that will get the uniform in the back there. right here, sir. >> i am from the national institute of allergy and disease at nah. before that i was on the army retired medical blog. i was actually recruited to nih because they military background because 12 years ago, the
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3